An Exercise in Divination


Owing to the mysterious nature of life, man, from the beginning, has been fascinated with divining the future. We are familiar with the story of the Three Magi, who divined from the position of the stars, that the Messiah was coming, and that the birth was to be heralded by a giant star.Modern man cannot escape this fascination either. There are so many ways of divination according to the philosophy and group think that one belongs to. Examples are the I-Ching, the Tarot, seashells, tea leaves, runes, etc.The Mahjong Tarot by Fiona Benjamin is a new if revolutionary addition to the arsenal of tarot divinations. Our take on it is that the reading is so alive, it is as if you are being nudged from your core–very uncannily accurate as to your present circumstances. One does hope that the future occurrences will likewise be as compelling as the present insights.

via An Exercise in Divination.

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A Synchronicity from Orion


From the Dogon to the ancient Egyptians, the Orion Constellation is revered as gods. We have thus substantiated this fact with our current work on Orion, by focusing on the Orion’s Belt, otherwise known as The Three Kings. And it doesn’t disappoint.Here are the recent (September 27, 2014) visual messages from Orion. The vibe is that all biological beings are born of the serpent, and the proof is the double snake of all biological DNA.

via A Synchronicity from Orion.

In Praise of Lanzones


September is when we have a surfeit of lanzones in Leyte, Philippines. The fruit reminds us of our dear mother, who passed away this month back in 1997–people would offer bunches of the fruit at her interment, and our grief was a bit assuaged knowing that it was the fruit of the gods.Lansium parasiticum (syn. Lansium domesticum), also known as langsat (/ˈlɑːŋsɑːt/) or lanzones,is a species of tree in the Mahogany family. The plant, which originates from western Southeast Asia, bears edible fruit. It is the provincial flower for the Indonesian province of South Sumatra. The tree is average sized, reaching 30 metres (98 ft) in height and 75 centimetres (30 in) in diameter. Seedling trees 30 years old planted at 8 x 8 meter spacing can have a height of 10 meters and diameter of 25 cm. The trunk grows in an irregular manner, with its buttress roots showing above ground. The tree’s bark is a greyish colour, with light and dark spots. Its resin is thick and milk coloured.[2]The pinnately compound leaves are odd numbered, with thin hair, and 6 to 9 buds at intervals. The buds are long and elliptical, approximately 9 to 21 centimetres (3.5 to 8.3 in) by 5 to 10 centimetres (2.0 to 3.9 in) in size. The upper edge shines, and the leaves themselves have pointed bases and tips. The stems of the buds measure 5 to 12 millimetres (0.20 to 0.47 in).[2]The flowers are located in inflorescences that grow and hang from large branches or the trunk; the bunches may number up to 5 in one place. They are often branched at their base, measure 10 to 30 centimetres (3.9 to 11.8 in) in size, and have short fur.[3] The flowers are small, with short stems, and have two genders. The sheathe is shaped like a five lobed cup and is coloured a greenish-yellow. The corona is egg-shaped and hard, measuring 2 to 3 millimetres (0.079 to 0.118 in) by 4 to 5 millimetres (0.16 to 0.20 in). There is one stamen, measuring 2 millimetres (0.079 in) in length. The top of the stamen is round. The pistil is short and thick.[2]

via In Praise of Lanzones.

The Orion’s Belt: An Epiphany


Intermittently, we do have dreams about a huge spaceship hovering above the night sky, their colored lights aflicker–that seemed to have a mind of its own, intent on doing us harm.  Our heart would seem to jump out of our rib cage, and we would cower in fear.  We would dart around, and the spaceship would always be a constant above our heads, seemingly intent to bomb us out.  The constant theme is that we have nowhere to hide

via The Orion's Belt: An Epiphany.

A Repost: A Philippine Hero: Benigno Aquino III


It seems to me that it is time to stop referring to the President casually, as if he were our pal, an ordinary guy we demanded be our president because he was of good parentage and decent character.For me, it is now Mr. President, or the President, or Benigno Aquino III, or minimally Noynoy Aquino. But no more Pnoy, no more Noy. No more casual.This is no ordinary guy.Now some will complain that I am a shill for the Administration, or brand me a yellow-tard, or cast some other credibility-destroying hard words my direction. And they will do this upon reading the headline, or before I even type a word past the first two paragraphs of this article.Which basically proves the point they are not really writing about my views, but about their bias against Mr. Aquino, probably based on an incident or two that upset them. So cast your stones. It makes no difference to me.This is no ordinary guy.Now some want the President to look like Fernando Poe or Piolo Pascual and have a movie star wife and seven kids and a dynasty in process with a kid in the Senate and another the Mayor. They want him to crush people like Pacquiao does and cheat on his wife and get rich by sucking up the taxpayer money like ordinary power-peddlers. You know, show some manhood.Well, to me the guy has more manhood in his character than all those addle-valued nutcases who are out to prove something to somebody ALL THE TIME because down deep they are blood-sucking leeches preying on our community, or are ineffectual pantywaists who are afraid of their own shadows.Normally, one’s legacy comes in the future. That gives time a chance to apply its talent to reveal the full meanings of acts undertaken today. Well, let’s just mosey down the road a piece, maybe 10 or 15 years, and look back at now. If we do that, we will see that some hints exist today about President Aquino’s eventual legacy.

via A Repost: A Philippine Hero: Benigno Aquino III.

Mike Rowe: A Transcript: Learning from Dirty Jobs


Note: My fascination with the nitty-gritty jobs done by farmers, carpenters, jobbers, shipbuilders and others, has not gone away. considering that theirs is the bedrock of society. Development is nothing without the input of hard labor. Very wrong indeed for us to insulate our progeny from doing the hard choices. After all, even the electrons in the atom are constantly whirling around in work. Very wrong to put emphasis on computers and iPods and on sedentary jobs that shorten one’s life span.With the Philippines on the cusp of industrialization. there is no way to hide under the rug the reality of dirty jobs, as they are even more crucial than the soft ones.We should gain insight into the brass tacks with the following transcript of a talk by Mike Rowe on the subject, as follows:

via Mike Rowe: A Transcript: Learning from Dirty Jobs.